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Authordc.contributor.authorPeña Ahumada, Bárbara 
Authordc.contributor.authorSaldarriaga Córdoba, Mónica 
Authordc.contributor.authorKardailsky, Olga 
Authordc.contributor.authorMoncada, Ximena 
Authordc.contributor.authorMoraga Vergara, Mauricio 
Authordc.contributor.authorMatisoo Smith, Elizabeth 
Authordc.contributor.authorSeelenfreund, Daniela 
Authordc.contributor.authorSeelenfreund, Andrea 
Admission datedc.date.accessioned2020-06-22T22:53:20Z
Available datedc.date.available2020-06-22T22:53:20Z
Publication datedc.date.issued2020
Cita de ítemdc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE Volumen: 15 Número: 5 Número de artículo: e0233113 May 18 2020es_ES
Identifierdc.identifier.other10.1371/journal.pone.0233113
Identifierdc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.uchile.cl/handle/2250/175635
Abstractdc.description.abstractHumans introduced paper mulberry (Broussonetia papyrifera) from Taiwan into the Pacific over 5000 years ago as a fiber source to make barkcloth textiles that were, and still are, important cultural artifacts throughout the Pacific. We have used B. papyrifera, a species closely associated to humans, as a proxy to understand the human settlement of the Pacific Islands. We report the first genetic analysis of paper mulberry textiles from historical and archaeological contexts (200 to 50 years before present) and compare our results with genetic data obtained from contemporary and herbarium paper mulberry samples. Following stringent ancient DNA protocols, we extracted DNA from 13 barkcloth textiles. We confirmed that the fiber source is paper mulberry in nine of the 13 textiles studied using the nuclear ITS-1 marker and by statistical estimates. We detected high genetic diversity in historical Pacific paper mulberry barkcloth with a set of ten microsatellites, showing new alleles and specific genetic patterns. These genetic signatures allow tracing connections to plants from the Asian homeland, Near and Remote Oceania, establishing links not observed previously (using the same genetic tools) in extant plants or herbaria samples. These results show that historic barkcloth textiles are cultural materials amenable to genetic analysis to reveal human history and that these artifacts may harbor evidence of greater genetic diversity in Pacific B. papyrifera in the past.es_ES
Patrocinadordc.description.sponsorshipComision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (CONICYT) FONDECYT 1120175 FONDECYT 1180052 University of Chile Programa PME (BP-A) Programa Enlace Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmaceuticas, PEEI 2017es_ES
Lenguagedc.language.isoenes_ES
Publisherdc.publisherPublic Library Sciencees_ES
Type of licensedc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Chile*
Link to Licensedc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/cl/*
Sourcedc.sourcePLoS ONEes_ES
Keywordsdc.subjectPapyrifera L. Vent.es_ES
Keywordsdc.subjectAncient DNAes_ES
Keywordsdc.subjectPacifices_ES
Keywordsdc.subjectPhylogeographyes_ES
Keywordsdc.subjectArchipelagoes_ES
Keywordsdc.subjectSequenceses_ES
Títulodc.titleA tale of textiles: Genetic characterization of historical paper mulberry barkcloth from Oceaniaes_ES
Document typedc.typeArtículo de revistaes_ES
Catalogueruchile.catalogadorlajes_ES
Indexationuchile.indexArtículo de publicación ISIes_ES


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Chile
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Chile